The Auzzie Dream Home- A Bumpy Road for Newly Weds

When Houda, a Sydney girl loyal to her south-west, married her dream man a few years ago, the last place she imaged herself to be in a year’s time is back living with her mother. Not alone. But, with her husband.

Since she got married in 2006, Houda now 23 has moved three times, downsizing from a stand-alone house in Prestons to a unit in Bankstown which she must vacate soon.

To find a house she and her husband could afford when they wed in 2006, they hiked up to Prestons, travelling a few extra kilometres to work and university each day. Although they both were born and raised in the South West—Houda in Liverpool and her husband in Bankstown, Prestons– a fairly new development area, seemed out of their way, but affordable.

Facade of Bankstown Town Hall

Bankstown Town Hall

“At that time it took me an hour just to get to college or work. It was time consuming. But…it was the only place I could find rent [property]. Both me and my husband had to work. I stayed there for six or seven months. Then, the guy that owed it put up the rent, which was very very difficult for us because we were just affording $320. To go up to $375 we found it very difficult”, said Houda.

With the dream of buying their own home lingering in the back of their mind, Houda accepted her mother’s offer to move in with her. “We wanted to save”, said Houda.

“We wanted to eventually buy our own home”.  

Saving towards that dream home meant Houda had to forgo her privacy as a newly-wed, sharing her mother’s house with other siblings.

“Of course the privacy. And you needed freedom. And just the space as well. We had all our furniture as well and couldn’t afford storage too”, Houda said.

After two years, Houda and her husband decided to do it alone again. She searched real estate agents in Liverpool, Bankstown and all surrounding suburbs for an affordable and liveable place to rent.

“It took us forever to find a home. It was very hard to find a rental property because you needed a good rental history. It had to be clean. But, because we didn’t have a long rental history, there was no way we could get it [property]”, Houda said.

That search ended a year ago at a two bedroom apartment in Bankstown where she pays $350 a week.

“Yeh, we had to pay a bit more. But we found that a bargain compared to what we were finding for $400, $450, maybe $380”, said Houda who is also dreading having to move again.

“We have to move out soon. And again we have to look for rent, which is again extremely hard. Right now we’re seeing places that are $400 or $450 a week”, she said.

“We want to save…we want to buy our own house. But we can’t. So what we might have to do is live with my brother. That way we can share the rent”.

Houda, who’s a qualified teacher now, works part-time while her husband sometimes works two jobs, to save and “hopefully” provide the baby on the way with more stable accommodation.

However, for Houda, the future in terms of accomodations, remains unpredictable as she plays it day by day.

“I thought…get married, have a husband, have our own home… then it’s kind of you have to move back in with your family. It’s kind of a shock…but you have to do what you have to do”, she said.

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Part 2- Rod Gets Eviction Notice for Asking Realestate To Fix Fence

Kurnell dans le comté de Sutherland, à Sydney

Sydney Metropolitan Area

Rod is one of 10,713 private renters in Bankstown Local Government Area and nearly 500,000 private renters in Sydney metropolitan area, according ABS figures published by NSW Housing. And, like many private renters, Rod has a unique story to tell. 

Rod has paid his rent on time for seven years. He has paid all the seven rent increases too, and “happily”, he says. But, every time Rod asked for a needed repair to the house, it hit deaf ears. The landlord has made only 2 out of 12 crucial repairs in seven years, says Rod.

Finally, the landlord had enough. When Rod lodged the last in a series of requests get fixed the over 50-year-old fence which fell and left him with no security, the landlord hit him with a baseless eviction notice.  

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Part 3 – Rod’s Plans to Fight Back

The Landlord

Rob is ready to give it to the landlord

Rod is not angry at the landlord for ignoring his pleas for repairs and making him live in dangerous conditions for over five years. He admits that during his seven years renting the Panania house, the landlord agreed to fix two out of the 12 crucial structural and safety repairs to the dwelling. But, angry or not, Rob is adamant to use “every loop-hole in the system to get what [he] deserves”. With an eviction notice, he is now ready to fight back.

Find out how Rod plans to get back at the landlord in Part-3.

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Part 1- Tenant Pays Rent, Gets Eviction Notice

Pania, City of Bankstown

Panania shops-Bankstown LGA

For seven years Rob 37, has lived in a poorly maintained private rental house in Panania, Sydney’s South West, as his repeated requestes for emergency repairs fall on deaf ears.

Despite paying over $130,000 in rent,”happily” adhering to seven rent rises along the way, and dodging electrocution from property wear and tear, Rod now faces an eviction notice which he will use to fight back.

Watch Rod as his struggle with his faceless landlord unfolds in Part-1.

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Headlines Geared to Shatter

Julia Gillard

Image via Wikipedia

 

Media headlines and reports during the pre-election campaign not only shattered confidences towards Julia Gillard and Tony Abbot, but also stabbed at progress in existing housing developments to raise unnecessary fears. The article “Nothing new on offer since the houses that Kevin built” is one of many examples.          

In a nutshell, it mentions that, unlike Gillard and Abbot, housing was high on Rudd’s agenda as he put in place needed policies to increase housing availability and ease housing costs, that some of his polices are successful and others are not, and that the contending party leaders were not seeing any importance in modifying shortfalls in existing polices to meet demand.        

The context of the article raises concern about the future of housing and undermines current progress in housing supply and affordability, building a perception of a serious issue.        

 “When Kevin Rudd sailed into office, it was in part due to Labor’s success in putting itself on the side of the angels when it came to housing costs.        

Rudd’s message was simple: he sympathised with families bleeding ever-larger payments on mortgages and rent. And he came to office offering policies aimed at increasing the supply of affordable properties to help reduce the pressures.”        

In a balancing act, he says in the sixth paragraph, “Some of the policies have enjoyed a measure of success”; hardly enough weight to offset five pages of scrutiny undermining steps forward.        

In paragraphs 18 and 19, the article flattens the federal government’s National Building Economic Stimulus Plan announced in 2008, which commits $5.2 billion to building 20,000 new social houses by 2013.  He quotes the Tenants Union of NSW saying, “the concern is that it is just a catch up”.       

So be it. The shortage of housing supply and affordability is not today’s problem. It is a legacy inherited from the previous reign of the Coalition government, exasperated by the global economic crisis.        

Why didn’t the fourth estate discover it sooner – when John Howard’s government neglected to even appoint a Minister for Housing.        

In a journalistic fashion of assembling selected facts to support an angle, the writer sets out to shatter voters’ confidences in both party leaders, setting himself up to report pessimistically on the policies put in place to address the issue.        

He fails to mention that as of December 2009, 5,690 homes were under construction nationally, and that state governments plan to allocate 50 per cent of new social housing homes to homeless Australians, or those at risk of homelessness.          

New social housing construction has begun on nearly 12,600 dwellings nationally since 2008, and nearly 1,200 dwellings have been completed.        

Also, as at March 2010, major repairs to 9300 home have added them to the housing stock, in addition to repairs to 71,500 other unappealing homes.        

A demand for housing supply and affordability does exist in Australia and more so in NSW-Sydney than in any other state or territory.       

But, policies are in place addressing the issue. These federal, state and local government policies, the details of which if unfolded, provide hope and open opportunities.        

“When Kevin Rudd sailed into office, it was in part due to Labor’s success in putting itself on the side of the angels when it came to housing costs.        

Rudd’s message was simple: he sympathised with families bleeding ever-larger payments on mortgages and rent. And he came to office offering policies aimed at increasing the supply of affordable properties to help reduce the pressures.”         

In a balancing act, he says in the sixth paragraph, “Some of the policies have enjoyed a measure of success”; hardly enough weight to offset five pages of scrutiny undermining steps forward.       

     

In paragraphs 18 and 19, the article flattens the federal government’s National Building Economic Stimulus Plan announced in 2008, which commits $5.2 billion to building 20,000 new social houses by 2013. He quotes the Tenants Union of NSW saying, “the concern is that it is just a catch up”.         

So be it. The shortage of housing supply and affordability is not today’s problem. It is a legacy inherited from the previous rein of the Coalition government, exasperated by the global economic crisis.         

Why didn’t the fourth estate discover it sooner – when John Howard’s government neglected to even appoint a Minister for Housing.         

In a journalistic fashion of assembling selected facts to support an angle, the writer sets out to shatter voters’ confidences in both party leaders, setting himself up to report pessimistically on the policies put in place to address the issue.          

He fails to mention that as of December 2009, 5,690 homes were under construction nationally, and that state governments plan to allocate 50 per cent of new social housing homes to homeless Australians, or those at risk of homelessness.           

New social housing construction has begun on nearly 12,600 dwellings nationally since 2008, and nearly 1,200 dwellings have been completed.         

Also, as at March 2010, major repairs to 9300 home have added them to the housing stock, in addition to repairs to 71,500 other homes previously unappealing.         

A demand for housing supply and affordability does exist in Australia and more so in NSW-Sydney than in any other state or territory. But, policies are in place to address it. These federal, state and local government policies, if we unfold their details, provide hope and opening opportunities.      

    

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Rental Housing – A Challenge, not crisis


Focus is a property management company that provides an alternative view on the housing market in Sydney; one that is not so gloomy but provides some reality to its clients with property portfolios.

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NSW government plans to meet housing growth

A exposure blended photo of the Sydney Opera H...

Image via Wikipedia

 

An interactive map that outlines the NSWs government plans to increase land supply in the growth centres of NW and SW Sydney, in addition to identifying new housing development sites in existing metropolitan Sydney areas. 

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