Headlines Geared to Shatter


Julia Gillard

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Media headlines and reports during the pre-election campaign not only shattered confidences towards Julia Gillard and Tony Abbot, but also stabbed at progress in existing housing developments to raise unnecessary fears. The article “Nothing new on offer since the houses that Kevin built” is one of many examples.          

In a nutshell, it mentions that, unlike Gillard and Abbot, housing was high on Rudd’s agenda as he put in place needed policies to increase housing availability and ease housing costs, that some of his polices are successful and others are not, and that the contending party leaders were not seeing any importance in modifying shortfalls in existing polices to meet demand.        

The context of the article raises concern about the future of housing and undermines current progress in housing supply and affordability, building a perception of a serious issue.        

 “When Kevin Rudd sailed into office, it was in part due to Labor’s success in putting itself on the side of the angels when it came to housing costs.        

Rudd’s message was simple: he sympathised with families bleeding ever-larger payments on mortgages and rent. And he came to office offering policies aimed at increasing the supply of affordable properties to help reduce the pressures.”        

In a balancing act, he says in the sixth paragraph, “Some of the policies have enjoyed a measure of success”; hardly enough weight to offset five pages of scrutiny undermining steps forward.        

In paragraphs 18 and 19, the article flattens the federal government’s National Building Economic Stimulus Plan announced in 2008, which commits $5.2 billion to building 20,000 new social houses by 2013.  He quotes the Tenants Union of NSW saying, “the concern is that it is just a catch up”.       

So be it. The shortage of housing supply and affordability is not today’s problem. It is a legacy inherited from the previous reign of the Coalition government, exasperated by the global economic crisis.        

Why didn’t the fourth estate discover it sooner – when John Howard’s government neglected to even appoint a Minister for Housing.        

In a journalistic fashion of assembling selected facts to support an angle, the writer sets out to shatter voters’ confidences in both party leaders, setting himself up to report pessimistically on the policies put in place to address the issue.        

He fails to mention that as of December 2009, 5,690 homes were under construction nationally, and that state governments plan to allocate 50 per cent of new social housing homes to homeless Australians, or those at risk of homelessness.          

New social housing construction has begun on nearly 12,600 dwellings nationally since 2008, and nearly 1,200 dwellings have been completed.        

Also, as at March 2010, major repairs to 9300 home have added them to the housing stock, in addition to repairs to 71,500 other unappealing homes.        

A demand for housing supply and affordability does exist in Australia and more so in NSW-Sydney than in any other state or territory.       

But, policies are in place addressing the issue. These federal, state and local government policies, the details of which if unfolded, provide hope and open opportunities.        

“When Kevin Rudd sailed into office, it was in part due to Labor’s success in putting itself on the side of the angels when it came to housing costs.        

Rudd’s message was simple: he sympathised with families bleeding ever-larger payments on mortgages and rent. And he came to office offering policies aimed at increasing the supply of affordable properties to help reduce the pressures.”         

In a balancing act, he says in the sixth paragraph, “Some of the policies have enjoyed a measure of success”; hardly enough weight to offset five pages of scrutiny undermining steps forward.       

     

In paragraphs 18 and 19, the article flattens the federal government’s National Building Economic Stimulus Plan announced in 2008, which commits $5.2 billion to building 20,000 new social houses by 2013. He quotes the Tenants Union of NSW saying, “the concern is that it is just a catch up”.         

So be it. The shortage of housing supply and affordability is not today’s problem. It is a legacy inherited from the previous rein of the Coalition government, exasperated by the global economic crisis.         

Why didn’t the fourth estate discover it sooner – when John Howard’s government neglected to even appoint a Minister for Housing.         

In a journalistic fashion of assembling selected facts to support an angle, the writer sets out to shatter voters’ confidences in both party leaders, setting himself up to report pessimistically on the policies put in place to address the issue.          

He fails to mention that as of December 2009, 5,690 homes were under construction nationally, and that state governments plan to allocate 50 per cent of new social housing homes to homeless Australians, or those at risk of homelessness.           

New social housing construction has begun on nearly 12,600 dwellings nationally since 2008, and nearly 1,200 dwellings have been completed.         

Also, as at March 2010, major repairs to 9300 home have added them to the housing stock, in addition to repairs to 71,500 other homes previously unappealing.         

A demand for housing supply and affordability does exist in Australia and more so in NSW-Sydney than in any other state or territory. But, policies are in place to address it. These federal, state and local government policies, if we unfold their details, provide hope and opening opportunities.      

    

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About Eleganza M

Simply, a journalist, MA student, mother and caring member of society seeking social justice and the Truth.
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